WHEN Jeremy Gask unsaddles Medicean Man after the King’s Stand Stakes, one of the most unlikely – and enduring – racing fairytales will end.

Selected in the 1990 All-Australian Teal Cup team with Anthony Koutoufides, Gavin Wanganeen, Glen Jakovich and Mitchell White, Gask was a gun footballer.

But injury prematurely ended his career with Sturt and he quickly became a force in South Australian training ranks.

He relocated to England 10 years ago to further his career and one of the first horses to appear in his yard was an immature youngster called Medicean Man.

Now 11, Medicean Man is as important to Gask as perennial Melbourne Cup contender Red Cadeaux was to Ed Dunlop.

Once the slowest two-year-olds Gask had ever handled, Medicean Man has evolved into a crack international sprinter with 13 wins and almost $1.5 million in prizemoney.

Harry Bentley riding Medicean Man (right) win The Chris O’Keeffe Sprint Stakes at Ascot.

On Tuesday night, after campaigning in five different countries over nine seasons, Medicean Man will retire after contesting the King’s Stand for the sixth time.

Underling rare durability, he will bid to add to four top-six finishes, including a desperately close second two years ago.

For Gask, who will return to Australia at the end of next month, Medicean Man deserves nothing less than a farewell Group 1 tilt.

“He really deserves or deserved a big one,” Gask said.

“His narrow defeat in the King’s Stand in 2015 was nearly a life changing moment for us all but he gave his all.

“He has run in the first four in multiple Group 1s.

Jeremy Gask in action for Sturt in 1992.

“However the biggest thrill for me personally was his win in Dubai (in the Meydan Sobha Trophy) this year as an 11-year-old.

“(He was) ridden by my apprentice David Parkes, who had had a tough time in the previous year with an awful injury, and my racing obsessed 15-year-old daughter Darcie, who took a couple of days off school to come with me to experience racing in Dubai, accepted the trophy.

“That was, as Bruce would say, special.”

Medicean Man is a 33-1 bolter but, regardless of where he finishes, Gask and several others are forever indebted to the chestnut.

Medicean Man gave Clare Lindop her first UK victory, Luke Nolen had his first ride at Royal Ascot on him before winning four days later on Black Caviar.

And Blake Shinn will make his Ascot debut on the ageless gelding.

Jeremy Gask during trackwork at Horses First training complex in England.

“To us personally he has given us the chance to travel to racing experiences we would never had.” Gask said.

“He was one of the first yearlings to the yard when we came and has been part of the family since.

“It wasn’t all plain sailing. He was without doubt the slowest two-year-old we have had though it was clear he was just so immature.

“I’ll never forget the first time Kerrie (Gask’s wife) came to see him in Dubai for his first Dubai World Cup night.

“She walked out on to the balcony which looked out over the track and burst into tears.

“That is what he means to us, or more specifically, what he has done for us. In a medium size yard these horses don’t appear often.

“He has really given us the confidence to be ambitious with a good horse.

“As a yard he is a star and owns the place. Good horses like him have a presence and it is clear to all he is the boss.

“Several staff have had great experiences travelling him around the world and I have been keen to give them these experiences.

“Again, he has done so much for all of us, a fact not forgotten.”

Michelle Payne will partner Kaspersky in the Group 1 Queen Anne Stakes.